surgery

Fonseca Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 3rd Edition Volume 3 PDF download

Fonseca Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 3rd Edition Volume 3 PDF Free Download
Fonseca Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 3rd Edition Volume 3 PDF
Preface:

This historical account is authored by a North American whose principal language is English. Although there are many foreign references and some written in English that I have not included or have overlooked, my apologies in advance. There is no slight intended. The author proposes to touch on the major events that shaped the development of orthognathic surgery over 170 years. I would appreciate hearing of any corrections, deletions, and additions from readers. It is only with your comments that an accurate account of orthognathic surgery will pass on to other generations. The Pioneering Era Little did Simon Hullihen realize that his 1849 publication would serve as the ignition switch for the development of the subspecialty of orthognathic surgery. His publication is the first known record of an operation performed to address jaw deformity and malocclusion.1 The significance of this publication is the undertaking of a novel operation to reposition the dentoalveolus of the mandible. Also of significance is that the operation occurred prior to the development of antibiotics or general anesthetics. Another monumental milestone recorded in this manuscript is the recognition that soft tissue scarring which contributed to the patient’s skeletal deformity had to be released to improve success. This bold maneuver was not accomplished in a major teaching center with observation theaters; it took place in the rural mining community of Wheeling, West Virginia. Hullihen is the first surgeon in the United States known to limit his practice to the face and neck and is considered the father of oral and maxillofacial surgery in this country. Mandibular Osteotomies Not much occurred in the development of mandibular osteotomies until near the end of the 19th century when several French surgeons, Jaboulay, Berard and Berger, published on subcondylar osteotomies for correction of prognathism.2,3 In the United States, Whipple and Angle, both orthodontists, reported cases of prognathism correction in 1898.4,5 The surgeons involved were Harvey Mudd and Vilray Blair. Blair was a general surgeon by training but his interest in mandibular corrective surgery led to the publication of several textbooks on this topic. Blair recognized the importance of orthodontic involvement in jaw surgery and relied on the expertise of Angle—who is considered the father of orthodontics—and others in the dental profession for guidance and advice. Blair and Angle seemed to have mutual respect and collaborated but never published together. Both were prolific writers and documented their experiences well.6-9 Angle published seven editions of a textbook, Treatment of Malocclusion of the Teeth and Fractures of the Mandible,10 and documented several orthognathic surgical cases. Blair’s book on Surgery of the Mouth and Jaws (Mosby) was also published in several editions and he also documented multiple osteotomy case. It appears that they were the first surgeon/orthodontist team whose work paved the way for the future. They recognized the importance of surgical and orthodontic collaboration and discussed pre- and postsurgical orthodontic treatment, timing and sequencing of surgery, and growth considerations. Most of Blair’s early surgical experience was in the body of the mandible, which he approached through neck incisions. By 1915 he altered his approach to the vertical ramus of the mandible.

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Taimour

Taimour is a co-founder of this blog. He likes to learn new things and have a passion for sharing with others.

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